Pros and Cons Between Septic and Sewer?

septic vs sewerThe two types of systems make up the overwhelming majority of methods to remove wastewater from the home. Fundamentally they work the same but a closer look reveals the differences between the two systems.

Many people have lived in homes with both types of systems and they have their own preferences. There is no clear cut winner in the debate.

Pros

Sewer

  1. Waste is removed from the house and fully managed by the town, city or municipality. Once you hit that flush lever and it leaves your premises it is no longer your problem.
  2. Sewer is more efficient at handling solid waste items such as kitty litter or feminine hygiene products. The larger pipe diameters allow this material to travel to its destination with less risk of a clog.

Septic Tank

  1. You are in control. You know exactly what is being flushed down the pipes. Which also means, you may attempt to fix your problems without a city worker yelling at you.
  2. You don’t have to pay the city a monthly fee to remove waste. Paying an extra 20 or 30 bucks a month can be annoying.

Cons

Sewer

  1. You are responsible to any pipe located on your property. Even if the problem was caused by the main sewage line under the street, you are responsible for your pipes.
  2. City sewer upgrades can result in increased billing or taxing.

Septic Tank

  1. If a tank gets really badly jammed up or is defective you have to call the pros to come out and work on it. This can get pretty expensive.
  2. Even if you run a really good household in regards to what you flush and how often you flush, you will eventually need to call an expert to pump the tank. And you may end up with sewage backed up in your yard if you don’t. And nobody likes this. This can cause disease and attract pests.

 

Conclusion

There are pros and cons to both systems and usually where you live decides what kind of system you are going to have installed. There are city statutes that don’t allow you to have a septic tank if you are on a main sewer line. The city may even make you pay thousands of dollars for the switch over if you live in a rural area that is converting to city pipes.

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